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Wednesday, 30 October 2013

#474 In the studio: Etching, the process, con't . . .


Start this series with Post # 470, October 16, 2013.

Next, the plate has been bitten or etched by the acid, the varnish ground is
removed with solvent and the plate is ready for printing.


Below, ink is forced into the etched lines of the cleaned plate with a rounded, leather dabber . . .
all lines of the etched drawing are filled with the thick ink.



Below, using a swirling motion, the ink is carefully wiped off of the plate surface with netting, called tarlatan,
which leaves the bitten lines full of ink.  The plate in now ready to go to the etching press.
This process is repeated for each individual print.



Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott


Sunday, 27 October 2013

#473 In the studio: Etching, the process, con't . . .


Start this series with Post # 470, October 16, 2013.

Next, I remove the plate from the acid, rinse it off, and use a stop-out varnish to the areas which I wish to remain lightest in tone;  in this case . . . the distant trees will eventually be stopped out and grass around the turkey in the foreground is being stopped out from the next acid bath with varnish.



Below, the plate is returned to the acid bath again and again so that some lines may be etched more deeply.
Additional stop-out varnish applications continue to add depth to the drawing.
This process is repeated over and over until all of the lines are bitten to the desired depth.
The deepest lines will print the darkest and will visually come forward . . . it is this repeated process
which gives the finished etching its impressive tonal range.
The image below shows the plate in its final acid bath.




Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott

Wednesday, 23 October 2013

#472 In the studio: Etching, the process, con't . . .


Start this series with Post # 470, October 16, 2013.

Below:  Next, a zinc metal plate is covered with a coat of varnish called an etching ground.




Below:  I draw the turkey design on the plate with a needle which cuts through the varnish and exposes the bare metal, without cutting into the metal itself.



Below:  I immerse the plate in an acid bath and the acid attacks the bare metal where I have drawn with a needle . . . thereby etching lines into the surface of the plate.  I sweep the bubbles formed by the aggressive acid with a feather - which is impervious to the acid - and time the acid's bite.



Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott

Sunday, 20 October 2013

#471 In the studio: Etching, the process, con't . . .


Start this series with Post # 470, October 16, 2013.

Etching, as a graphic process, has been used for picture-making since the early 16th Century.
Noteworthy artists who worked with etching were Rembrandt, Goya, Whistler, Picasso, Borein, and Benson.

Etching combines an original art form and a reproductive process and should not be confused
with modern photographic, limited edition techniques.

 Each etching is an original and there is artistic interpretation with every print throughout the process. 
The addition of transparent watercolor to the etching further signifies originality and the artist's hand. 

The first step I take in making an etching begins with drawing on paper. 

Below, I research my subject and make several drawings which, later on, enables more spontaneous
work while drawing on the etching plate.   Line drawing is the essential characteristic of etching.














Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott


Wednesday, 16 October 2013

#470 In the studio: Introduction to etching


Sandy and Trish are on a field trip to Tanzania, Africa.
 In their absence, an introduction to original printmaking and ETCHING has been pre-posted.

During the 1970s, Sandy Scott's etchings of rural, wildlife, and sporting subjects became widely known to collectors, museums, and galleries across the United States and Canada.

Her small, hand-pulled editions printed on exquisite French rag paper with sepia ink
and her innovative technique of applying transparent watercolor, became her trademark.



 The National Cowboy Hall of Fame, now known as The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum
in Oklahoma City, held a one-woman exhibition of her etchings in 1978.
In 1983, she won the Printmaking Medal of Honor at the American Artists Professional League in New York . . .
the award winning etching "Sleeping Cat", is shown below.



In1980, she turned her attention to sculpture and produced her last portfolio of etchings in 1983.
Her early etchings, however, can still be collected from the artist and found in galleries, museums,
and on the secondary market.


In 1982, Watson Guptill published Masters of Western Art, written by Mary Carroll Nelson describing
Sandy's etching working method.  The next 7 blogposts will revisit her technique.





Next Sunday's  blog begins the introduction to etching series.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott



Sunday, 13 October 2013

#469 A new book: "Art of the National Parks"


Earlier this year, a new book entitled, "Art of the National Parks", was introduced.
The book includes 70 artists who offer distinctive visions of 8 of the nation's beloved national parks.

With more than 450 artworks in 430 pages, this glorious, large format book is a must for
anyone who has hiked the trails, watched a sunset, marveled at buffalo herds,
or yearned to experience America's mythic and transformative vistas.  

Published by Fresco Fine Art Publications, co-authored by Susan Hallsten McGarry,
well-known author;  Jean Stern,  curator and art-historian;  and Terry Lawson Dunn,
biologist and educator, the book is an indispensable compendium of artists who are at the
forefront of 21st century American landscape and wildlife art.


Below, included in Yellowstone section of the book are friends and fellow artists . . .
Clyde Aspevig, Scott Christensen, Ralph Oberg,  Jim Wilcox, and more.
Jim's painting is featured on the cover of the magnificent book.



My work was included in the Yellowstone National Park section.
Below, are images of works featured.




 Sleepy Fox
18"H 15"W 9"D


 Ancient Way
20"H 24"W 11"D


 Red-tailed Hawk at Sappa Creek
42"H 30"W 25"D


 Harbinger of Light
13H 20"W 16"D


Hay Bay
19"H 25"W 14"D


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott

Wednesday, 9 October 2013

#468 In the field: Yellowstone . . . epilogue


After the Cody show last month - see post # 463, Sept. 22 -  We entered Yellowstone through the east entrance on a beautiful fall day and enjoyed a field trip.  The magnificent park is close to home and is a great resource for observing, sketching and photographing wildlife in their natural habitat.

The trip proved to be very productive . . . particularly regarding one of my favorite subjects:  Moose.
We spent two hours along the Lamar River with a young bull, cow, and two yearlings - 
see post # 464, Sept. 25. 


Below is a page from my sketchbook.




An incoming snowstorm cut our visit short and the day after our return home, we woke up to 10 inches
 of snow.  We live at the base of the Wind River Range on the Popo Agie River, which flows into the Wind River, which eventually flows into the Yellowstone River.  The Winds are an integral part of the greater Yellowstone ecosystem.

Below, is my little design studio . . . separate from the main studio, we call it the Christmas Cabin.
The rustic little cabin has electricity, is located a few feet above the Popo Agie, and is my private getaway.
Note, the leaves have not turned yet and the limbs bend under the heavy, early snow.



Below, a scene from the deck . . . the Popo Agie River flows past  our home and studios.
A snow-laden tree has fallen into the river not far from the Christmas Cabin.




Below, using reference and inspiration gathered on the Yellowstone field trip, I work on a moose sculpture 
in front of the pot-bellied stove on a snowy day, with Penny, our Brittany. 







Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott


Sunday, 6 October 2013

#467 In the field: Yellowstone, con't . . .


While in Yellowstone recently, we saw many different animal species including the Grizzly.
Years ago,  it was fairly uncommon to see them . . . but we see them almost every visit now. 

We live less than three hours southeast of the park and griz are routinely seen now in places we hike and fish.
We're very cautious in these areas, hike with a bell and bear spray, and there are some places close to home that we simply don't venture into now . . .  Grizzly continue to move into our section of the Wind River Range south of Yellowstone.

Below, while on our recent Yellowstone field trip,  I took this shot in the Hayden Valley as we spotted a griz  foraging and crossing a distant meadow.  We moved on as he appeared to be moving our way.



The  Grizzly is one of my favorite subjects and I've experienced the bear not only in Yellowstone,
but on the many trips I've taken to Alaska over the years.

Below, are images of  Grizzly I photographed thirty three years ago on my first trip to Alaska.  
I was on Kodiak Island - where the griz is known as the Brown Bear -  and back then,
I used a Pentax 35 mm, and shot a lot of black and white.





Like most artists, I've always used the camera in conjunction with my sketchbook.
During the '70s, my primary interest was etching and original printmaking.

Below, is a small portfolio of etchings and sculpture depicting the splendid animal:  Grizzly!








Kodiak Moment


Kodiak Moment


Power Hungry



On the Rocks


Chum Run Monument



Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott


Wednesday, 2 October 2013

#466 In the field: Yellowstone, con't . . .


While in Yellowstone last week, we encountered many different animal species - including the American Bison.


Below, are images of a memorable field trip in Yellowstone.












Below, in the distance . . . Yellowstone geyser drama.  Bison love this location in the winter.




Having just completed a bison monument for the Briscoe Museum in San Antonio - see blog posts #458  through #461, I was very familiar with the subject and was anxious to model a little clay study of the magnificent animal in the field.

Below, I set up my sculpture stand a safe distance from a small herd in the Dunraven area, enjoyed a picnic,
shot a few photos, and started with my typical working method . . .  sketches in my sketchbook.





Below, the little clay study progressed quickly, although it was difficult to warm the clay in the crisp, late afternoon air.








Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott