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Friday, 31 August 2012

#307 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


As the welds are chased away and blended into the surrounding metal textures, I spend many hours in the foundry.  The metal chasing step in the process is very important to the artist: The integrity of the surface and what was modeled into the clay must flow seamlessly.  A metal chaser is a highly trained technician and must be sensitive to and aware of the sculptors modeling techniques.

To learn more about this project, start with Post #274.





Wednesday, 29 August 2012

#306 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


A workman covers his eyes to avoid the flash of the welder as fit-up and welding continues on the antlers.

To learn more about this project, start with post #274.





Monday, 27 August 2012

#305 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


The legs are assembled, tacked together in preparation for attachment.

To learn more about this project, start with post #274. 



Saturday, 25 August 2012

#304 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


Fit-up continues . . . The welds will be ground off or "chased" as the monument nears completion.  During chasing, the metal chaser will blend and integrate the weld marks . . . leaving no trace of seam lines.  

 To learn more about this project, start with Post #274.



Thursday, 23 August 2012

#303 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .



The panels are assembled, fit-up, and tacked together with welds.
Below, notice the panel #28 discussed in the previous post.




To learn more about this project, start with Post #274.





Tuesday, 21 August 2012

#302 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


Before fit-up and welding begins, the bronze panels are placed on the floor, and using the numbered resin cast maquette as a guide; the enormous sculpture is assembled like a jigsaw puzzle.

Note, the panels were numbered in clay and are visible in the cast bronze.
These numbers will be ground off or "chased" as the work is completed.

To learn more about this project, start with Post #274. 



Sunday, 19 August 2012

#301 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


I live less than five miles from the foundry and when my work is being cast, I spend many hours at the foundry.
Below, as the cleaned panels come out of sandblasting, I inspect the bronze.

To learn more about this project, start with Post #274.



Friday, 17 August 2012

#300 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


Below, the bronze sprews are cut off from the
panels and returned to the pouring floor where
they will be melted down for future use.






For more information on this project, start with Post #274.





Wednesday, 15 August 2012

#299 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


The bronze panels, devoid of ceramic shell, are taken to the sandblasting room where they are cleaned.

For to learn about this project, start with Post #274.


Monday, 13 August 2012

#298 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


At right, the ceramic shell, filled with bronze, has cooled, is broken off with a hammer and removed from the solidified bronze.




For more information about this project, start with Post #274.





Below, notice a moose eye . . . now cast in bronze.





Saturday, 11 August 2012

#297 In the foundry: "Moose Flats", con't . . .


Below, molten bronze is poured into the ceramic shell, filling the space vacated by 
the wax as the centuries old cire perdue or "lost wax" bronze casting process continues.

For more information about this project, start with Post #274.


Thursday, 9 August 2012

#296 In the foundry: "Moose Flats", con't . . .


The heated and glowing ceramic shells, devoid of wax, are removed from the furnace, then placed and stabilized in a sand pit . . . the bronze pour begins.


For more information on this project, start with Post #274






Tuesday, 7 August 2012

#295 In the foundry: "Moose Flats", con't . . .


The empty ceramic shells have been returned to the furnace to heat up while bronze ingots are melted in a crucible.  The temperature of the liquid bronze
must reach 2180 degrees before it is ready to pour.


For more information about this project, start with Post #274.




Sunday, 5 August 2012

#294 In the foundry: "Moose Flats", con't . . .


Below, the burn-out is complete and the ceramic shells are empty and devoid of wax.
Bronze will soon occupy the space inside the shell. 

For more information about tis project, start with Post 274. 



Friday, 3 August 2012

#293 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" con't . . .


During the wax burn-out, the ceramic shell which encases the sprewed wax panel
is put in a furnace.  The wax is melted or "lost" as it escapes and drains away.

The French name cire perdue or "lost wax" bronze casting derives its
name from this step in the process.

Below, notice the spout or trough that emerges from the furnace:  As the wax begins to melt inside the ceramic shell, it drips out into a bucket and momentarily catches fire.


To learn more about this project, start with post #274.





Wednesday, 1 August 2012

#292 In the foundry: "Moose Flats" . . .


The sprewed wax panel is heavily incrusted in a thick, hardened 
ceramic shell and ready for the next step, which is the wax burn-out.

To learn more about this project, start with Post #274.