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Wednesday, 30 April 2014

#526 In the field: Brookgreen Gardens workshop, con't . . .


Start this series with  #522,  April 16, 2014.  http://www.brookgreen.org

 During the morning of day 1 of the class, we visited Brookgreen Garden's excellent aviary and zoo and observed and photographed birds such as the Great Horned Owl, Barred Owl, Red-tailed Hawk, and Bald Eagles shown below.









The plan was to model a simple head study and learn about making molds before
beginning a more in-depth study of bird anatomy and structure.

Upon returning to the classroom, we used the aviary experience along with computer searches as reference
for modeling a head study.  Shown below is a workshop participant preparing a sculpture for molding.



All birds have the same basic feather groups around the head and the sculptor must
identify the individual feather sets and shapes while modeling a bird's head.

Below, is a clarified drawing of a songbird with the individual head feather groups identified.



Below, is a drawing and a clay model head study of a Great Horned Owl that I created in class as a demonstration.
I invited the workshop participants to "follow me" while constructing a simple armature and building shapes to form
the owl's distinctive head features.   Plunging in and modeling in clay on the first morning of the workshop
was enjoyed by all.  The afternoon session of day 1 began the exploration of bird anatomy, wing structure,
feather groupings, and armature building and will be discussed in the next blog.





Below, is a bronze sculpture depicting head studies of a Red-tailed Hawk.


Reflection and Resolve
7"H 8"W 6"D

This year, we had a small class for the Brookgreen Gardens 5-day bird sculpture workshop and therefore were able to introduce mold making to the class.  I've taught bird sculpture and anatomy for 28 years and have had many requests
to offer the mold making experience . . . a small class presented the opportunity and Trish Smith - who has made my molds for over 20 years - was on hand with material and expertise to lead the way.
http://www.brookgreenworkshops.com

Below . . . throughout the week, Trish explained and demonstrated rubber
mold material mixing, shimming, and rubber application.





To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.

For a complete list of  the blog subjects go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish



Sunday, 27 April 2014

#525 In the field: Brookgreen Gardens workshop


Start this series with  #522,  April 16, 2014.  http://www.brookgreen.org

Earlier this month I taught a 5-day bird anatomy, armature building, and sculpture
workshop at Brookgreen Gardens at Murrell's Inlet, South Carolina.
http://www.brookgreenworkshops.com

Though animal sculptors do not need to be scientists, they must know and understand the important bones, joints and muscles, not only where they attach but how they articulate.  In addition to this knowledge the bird sculptor must know the major feather groups, individual feather construction and the mechanics of flight.

Below . . .  a "chalk-talk" session during the workshop.






Workshops provide  continuing education for adults and an opportunity to learn from a working professional artist/instructor.  I enjoy working with students of all levels of proficiency; particularly beginners and painters.  We focus on birds in flight and my teaching method is structured and methodical . . . a step by step "follow me" approach.

Below, are images taken during April's 5-day workshop at Brookgreen Gardens.




Below, discussing and critiquing wing structure of excellent student block-in sculptures
depicting a barn swallow and a bufflehead duck.





To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.




Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish



Wednesday, 23 April 2014

#524 In the field: Brookgreen Gardens aviary, con't . . .


Start this series with  #522,  April 16, 2014.

Brookgreen Gardens is an accredited museum that is home to America's largest and most important collection of figurative sculpture.  The purpose of the world renowned museum is to collect, conserve, and exhibit 
American figurative sculpture in a beautiful garden setting and to educate a diverse audience about 
sculpture, horticulture, and the ecology and history of the Lowcountry.  

The museum also collects, conserves, and exhibits the plants, animals, and cultural materials of the South Carolina Lowcountry and is a wealth of information, education, and visual excitement for the artist.

Brookgreen Gardens is located in Murrell's Inlet, South Carolina.  http://www.brookgreen.org

While teaching a bird sculpture and anatomy workshop at Brookgreen Gardens this month, I had the opportunity to photograph, experience, sketch, and model sculpture studies in the museum's outstanding aviary and zoo.
Below,  are images of the Black- crowned Night Heron taken in the aviary.














Below, I'm modeling a quick head study sketch of a Black- crowned Night Heron in the aviary.







To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.




Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Sunday, 20 April 2014

#523 In the field: Brookgreen Gardens aviary


Please see the previous post . . .   #522,  April 16, 2014 for the introduction to this series.

The aviary at Brookgreen Gardens in South Carolina's low country has been a favorite
source of information and research for many years.  I've experienced and learned much
about wading and marsh birds from the natural yet enclosed environment. 

This spring, while teaching a five day workshop about bird sculpture, bird anatomy, and armature building at Brookgreen,  I've spent many hours in the aviary . . . photographing, observing, experiencing, and sketching the resident species.  Below, are photos taken in the aviary of one of my favorites . . . the Black-crowned night heron.










I can't wait to start a head study and more sculptures depicting the Black-crowned night heron.
The bird is chunky and squat with a thick neck, heavy bill, large head, short legs, and broad, rounded wings . . .
all shapes that are important for the bird artist to realize.  I'm collecting data and experience, which is necessary to sculpt the species.  Flight is minimal in an aviary, therefore, I've researched the bird in flight on the computer . . . the head is held back against the shoulders, making their neck disappear.  Much can be learned by the artist by augmenting their
"in the field" experience with further exploration in the library or on the computer.

Below, are sketchbook entries at the Brookgreen aviary.






To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.




Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Wednesday, 16 April 2014

#522 In the field: Black-crowned night heron


I spent today photographing birds in the low-country
of coastal South Carolina at Brookgreen Gardens.  Brookgreen is not only home to America's largest
and most important collection of figurative sculpture,
but the museum's grounds and gardens boast an outstanding zoo, aviary, and  additional features
to entice and delight artists. 

I'm anxious to start a sculpture of a Black-crowned
night heron and while teaching a bird sculpture workshop during the day at Brookgreen,
I'm spending early mornings and evenings
at the enclosed aviary. . . experiencing,
studying, sketching, and photographing birds.

I'm gathering an enormous amount of reference and
am confident that I have sufficient material to successfully depict the species in the studio.  Typically,
I select a subject based upon memorable "in the field" experiences and my time spent with the Black-crowned night heron at Brookgreen has been rewarding.

www.brookgreen.org/‎



















To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish



Sunday, 13 April 2014

#521 Remarque: Spring Pride


When I sign my work and send it out into the world, I think of a bird leaving the nest or perhaps 
of a child leaving home. I wonder how what I saw, felt and expressed will affect the viewer.


Spring Pride
6"H 11"W 8"D


To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish
  


Wednesday, 9 April 2014

#520 Throw on another log . . . making it in the art world



Recently, a gallery owner told me that a collector had walked in with a group of paintings purchased at the gallery and wanted to return them . . . explaining that the paintings were impossible to live with after reading a political rant on social media by the artist who had created them . . . sadly, I knew the artist.

We all know the benefits of social media . . .  
we not only promote and reveal our work but communicate with fellow artists and friends, express our  conservation concerns and enjoy input and feedback. The flip side to this is the people out there who are interested in our art, who routinely monitor, see, and read our posts but can truly be offended by politically charged,  controversial, non-art issues.                                                                                                                 
When I started out - over 40 years ago - computers were in the distant future and artists interfaced with collectors, galleries, museums, trade magazines, other artists  [excluding friends],  and the press; we socialized on a
different level and one topic was taboo:  politics.  It still should be.



To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish



Sunday, 6 April 2014

#519 In the studio: The Tom Browning portrait


Last Sunday, I posted a blog about a new eagle monument in progress in the Wyoming studio . . . 
see post # 517, dated March 30, 2014.  Since then, I've had several inquiries about 
the portrait shown in the upper left corner of the image shown below.

The portrait  in my studio was painted twelve years ago by the superlative painter - Tom Browning.  Tom and Joyce have been dear friends for over 25 years.  Incredibly, one wing of the eagle that I'm now working on, years later, is shown on the far left side of Tom's painting!

This proves the comment I've posted several  times in my
blog that I routinely start a number of different sculptures and keep them "in progress" for many years . . . tweaking, refining, and eventually completing most - but not all - of them.

The Tom Browning painting is what I would grab on the 
            way out if I had a studio fire . . . oh, and the        
Kuhn drawings above the north windows.


 With Browning and Kuhn to inspire me, below are images of works in progress in the
northwest corner of the Wyoming design studio.
















To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish
  

Wednesday, 2 April 2014

#518 In the field: Briscoe Museum, "Night of the Artists"


For more information about the Briscoe Museum's Night of the Artists,
scroll back to Post# 516, March 26, 2014.
http://www.briscoemuseum.org/about




Last weekend, I was deeply honored to be presented with the Briscoe Museum's
Legacy Award for Lifetime Achievement and to join the group of previous Legacy Award recipients:

Bill Owen,  2013
Martin Grelle,  2012
Ken Carlson,  2011
Kent Ullberg,  2010
G. Harvey,  2009
Clark Hulings,  2008
Howard Terpning,  2007

Below, it was a special honor to be introduced by my dear friend, Robin Salmon: Vice-President of Art and
Historical Collections and Curator of Sculpture at Brookgreen Gardens, Murrell's Inlet, South Carolina.
She flew in for the occasion and was the guest of the museum.
http://www.brookgreen.org



Below, Dr. Steven Karr, Executive Director of the Briscoe, presented me with the Legacy Award
last Friday night at the Night of the Artists awards gala.

     Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic 


 Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic


Below, I am with Jack and Valerie Guenther.  Jack and Val have been friends for over 30 years.
As founders of the Briscoe, it is their vision that has created a magnificent museum along
San Antonio's famed Riverwalk, dedicated to interpreting and celebrating the West.

 Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic 


      Below, I'm talking with fellow sculptor, T. D. Kelsey about his exciting new sculpture commission for the
Briscoe Museum.  The enormous work is scheduled to be installed in time for next years Night of the Artists.


Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic


To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish