Wednesday, 29 January 2014

#500 Museum Shows: The Autry, con't . . . "Pigmalion"



"The Masters of Western Art is recognized as the premier Western art exhibition and sale in the country," 
said John Geraghty, Autry Museum Trustee and Special Advisor to Masters.  "It has become the benchmark for 
each of the other major art events and has brought the nation's most prominent artists and supporters to the Autry.  
Our artists have provided an exceptional presentation of paintings and sculptures for the 2014 Masters.  In their capable hands, we can rest assured that the Western art genre remains strong and will thrive for many generations to come."


For more information start with post #498, Jan. 22 and go to
theautry.org/masters

Shown below, is another new work for my 2014 shows.
Pigmalion (18"H 18"W 11"D) will be introduced at the Autry Museum's Masters of the American West Show.










Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish Smith


Sunday, 26 January 2014

#499 Museum Shows: The Autry, con't . . . "King of the Coop"


One of America's most important Western art show, the Masters of the American West Fine Art Exhibition and Sale, 
celebrates its 17th anniversary at the Autry National Center with opening-day activities on Saturday, February 1, 2014. The juried exhibition and sale features 82 artists, including a newly added guest artist group of emerging talent, whose work is stylistically and thematically diverse.

For information see post #498, Jan. 22, and go to 
http://theautry.org/


Shown below, is another new work for my 2014 shows.
King of the Coop (18"H 10"W 7"D) will be introduced at the Autry Museum's Masters of the American West Show.










Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish Smith



Wednesday, 22 January 2014

#498 Museum Shows: Autry Masters of Western Art, "Tethered Goats"


The invitational and juried museum shows such as the Autry Museum's Masters of the American West have played an important role in the resurgent interest in representational art.  Quality, originality and healthy competition among the artists has been the result and astute collectors and museums recognize it.

The prestigious show is a coveted invitation and I always introduce new work at the gala event.  
The Masters of Western Art Show and Sale opens Feb. 1, 2014.

Shown below, is one f the new works I will introduce . . . Tethered Goats.
For more information about the creation of this sculpture, go to Posts #451 and 452, Aug.11 and 14, 2013.


Tethered Goats 


 Tethered and Tangled


Tethered Goat


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish Smith


Sunday, 19 January 2014

#497 In the field: photography in Africa


Please start this series of posts with #477 

The recent trip to Africa was the most productive and exciting "in the field" experience of my life.  Productive, because we returned with over 20,000 digital photos of animals we had never seen before in the wild . . . we are still going through and editing them.  Most important . . . I returned with motivation, inspiration, and urgency, that I have never felt.  There was not a moment in the field that we could put our cameras down because we encountered so many animals and there was so much action.  While on safari Trish and I each had two cameras with us at all times in addition to a little pocket camera we called our "mouse cameras" and fresh back-up batteries for all.  We both relied on our telephoto zoom lens for the many close-ups that are proving to be invaluable in the creation of sculpture.

The images presented in this post are currently being used in the studio as reference for several lion and elephant sculptures in progress.  As mentioned in previous posts about the African adventure, a sculptor must collect reference and data regarding detail, texture, form, proportion, and more to create sculpture.  However,  the only way an artist can connect with their subject is the up-close and personal, "in the field" experience with the animal itself.




























Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish Smith


Wednesday, 15 January 2014

#496 In the field: Africa . . . conclusion of Part I


Please start this series of posts with #477 

This post and the next, concludes Part I of the Africa series.  I will return with Part II in a few weeks and 
introduce 10 new species.   Part I focused on 10 species:  cheetah, leopard, lion, rhino, secretary bird, ostrich, flamingo, hippo, hoopoe, and elephant.  I currently have 12 block-in sculptures of African subjects in progress 
and as the work is completed and prepared for casting, I will post images.

In conclusion, it may be useful to know how I, as a sculptor, use a camera and interpret the results in the field 
and in the studio.  A sculptor works in a much different way than a painter . . . a painter paints what they see 
and a sculptor sculpts what they know.  While a painter uses light, color, edges, value, perspective, 
and more to create an illusion on a two- diminutional surface, a sculptor creates an actual form of a 
figure that exists in space  Knowledge of structure and anatomy is a must in order to 
build the armature and assemble forms and shapes.  

Below, is a sculpture of a leopard blocked in and in progress.





As I mentioned in the last post, I prepared a sketchbook of various animal skeletons to use  in conjunction with 
the camera equipment while on safari in Tanzania.  The drawings were invaluable while observing 
animal locomotion in the field and while reviewing my digital images.  


While on the photo safari in the Serengeti, we achieved the best results by waiting and watching at watering holes in the morning and evening.  Most animals ignored us in the Land Rover and we were able to get very close to our subjects without stressing them.  Our tent camp was located inside the park so we could stay and photograph until dark.

Below,  is a photo of zebras taken at a Serengeti water hole.




While at Tarangire, our camp - Kikoti Camp - was outside the park and we had to exit by 6 p.m.  
Many great photo opportunities occurred on the drive back to camp.  

Below, are zebras at the watering hole next to Kikoti Camp.




In Tarangire, we left camp for the park at dark in the morning and were constantly on the move.  We encountered animals at almost every turn and were compelled to keep moving in our excitement.  Many times, we would see more than one species together.  

Below, is a typical image from our photo safari in Tanzania. . . several species 
in one area such  as zebra, wildebeest, and African buffalo in the distance.   




As a wildlife sculptor, I go to the field so I can work and I work so I can go to the field.
Below, is a review of several block-ins of work in progress since my return from Africa.
I will continue focusing on "in the field" photography in the next post.









For anatomy reference, go to posts #563, #616, and #655
Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish Smith


     

Sunday, 12 January 2014

#495 In the field: Africa . . . Elephant, con't . . .



Please start this series of posts with #477 

The most important data I took to Africa - along with my camera equipment - was a sketchbook full of skeleton drawings.   
I obtained a list the various species I could expect to see, and researched each ones' skeleton.  
The drawings proved invaluable while observing the animal's locomotion and structure. .


The elephant's skeleton must support enormous weight and mass.  The animal has an almost vertical pelvis . . . 
the short neck is almost horizontal and 21 pairs of ribs form a huge, barrel-shaped cage.  
The vertebrae are connected by tight joints which limit the backbone's flexibility.

Below, is a photo taken in Tarangire . . . note the almost vertical pelvic bone.



The elephant's limbs form a direct line and results in a pillar of support for the huge mass. . . the enormous shoulder blades provide support for muscles from the forelimbs.  As in all mammals, the elephant has 
7 neck vertebrae . . . they are, however, fused together to handle the weight of the head and tusks.

Below, is a photo taken in Tarangire . . . note the direct line from the scapula and the 
forelimb that results in a pillar of support for animal's enormous bulk.



The shape of the skull is different between the male and the female:  The female skull forms a ridge or bump over the forehead, resulting in a distinctive square-like appearance while the male has a rounded forehead.

Below, are photos taken in Tarangire.  Note the difference between the square-like ridge of the female's forehead in the first photo, and the rounded forehead of the male in the second photo.
  




Elephants cannot trot, gallop, or jump but they can move backwards and forwards.  They have two gaits:  
The walk and a faster walk which is similar to running. The fast-walk gait gives the appearance of a 'run'.  An elephant always has a leg on the ground and when it is moving fast, their front legs bounce in a running manner.  Their back legs, however, walk in a smooth manner when fast-walking.  It's hard to convince anyone who has been charged by a 5-ton elephant that the animal wasn't actually running!

Below, are three photos of a walking elephant.  I took hundreds of sequential photos similar to this of elephants in motion.  







Below, is a photo of a "fast walking" baby elephant . . . ears flying, the movement gives the appearance of 'running' but the gait is actually a fast walk.





For anatomy reference, go to posts #563, #616, and #655
Blog, text, photos, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish Smith


Wednesday, 8 January 2014

#494 In the field: Africa . . . Elephant, con't . . .


Please start this series of posts with #477

  While in Tarangire, every morning before daybreak, we were awakened with a pot of coffee brought to 
our tent and left camp for a game drive before the sun came up.  Our box breakfast and lunch were sent 
in the Land Rover which allowed us to maximize our time afield.  One morning, while we were enjoying our 
"bush breakfast", we were delighted to see a herd of elephants on a rise behind us, 
headed to our destination - the Silale Swamp.  Below, are photos that represent  unforgettable 
memories and a source of reference and experience that will remain with me for the rest of my life.















Upon my return from Africa, I was overwhelmed with the urge to get my hands on clay . . . never had I experienced 
so much input from wildlife in the field.  The creative impulse was so profound that I started a sculpture of a trumpeting elephant on my first day back in the studio before the warming box had a chance to soften my clay!   It is now two months later, I continue to be inspired and in the same zone with over ten sculptures of various species in progress.  Shown below, is the first block-in of my African portfolio and a drawing from my Tanzania sketchbook.

   



For anatomy reference, go to posts #563, #616, and #655
Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish Smith